Thursday, April 10, 2014

KineScribe Workshop

Submitted by Mei-Chen Lu and Charlotte Wile - April 10, 2014

The videos below show Hannah Kosstrin’s Workshop on "KineScribe" at the DNB on March 15, 2015.

KineScribe is an iPad app that reimagines LabanWriter for the touch screen, allowing you to create and edit Laban based notation, including Labanotation, Motif Notation, and Language of Dance.

To download KineScribe for free, go here.



Workshop attendees:




Video 1 
Content: iPad basics, new KineScribe scores, symbol palates, stretchable symbols, resizing symbols, and deleting symbols.





Video 2
Content: resizing symbols, changeing levels, moving symbols around, and changing bows.



Video 3
Content: resizing the symbols for hold and center of weight , coloring symbols, save/email a score, creating a staff, adding measures, deleting and changing staffs and measures.





Video 4
Content: floor plans, pins inside of the floorplan, changing direction signs, the gender of pins, and text.




Video 5
Content: text, and KineScribe applications.




Video 6
Content: KineScribe applications



Thursday, April 3, 2014

The Dance Director, by Ray Cook


Contributed by Ray Cook
Submitted by Charlotte Wile - April 3, 2014

This posting contains a facsimile of Ray Cook's The Dance Director, revised and enlarged edition (1981) .  

Cook describes the book as follows:
"This book is designed for use by both student and teacher. The student will find that the material is self-explanatory and will be able to work at his own pace, applying the suggestions to his reading studies. The teacher may use it as a guideline in teaching a course on directing or reconstruction, adding many more example that given here. The material is useful for any class utilizing Labanotation. The lay reader who enjoys the dance can come to appreciate the complexities of the process which leads to that sometimes all-inspiring dance performance." (p. 2)
The PDF facsimile of the full book is very large, so it is being posted here in 5 sections. (Note: Blank pages in the book have been left out of the facsimile).


1)   Cover to page 37.

2)   Pages 38 to 74.

3)   Pages 75 to 109.

4)   Pages 110 to 148.

5)   Page 149 to the end.

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Spatial Territories


By Richard Haisma et al.
Submitted by Charlotte Wile – March 1, 2014

[The following discussion was originally posted on LabanTalk and CMAlist in February 2014.


From Richard Haisma - February 14, 2014

Hello Labanistas and Bartenieophiles,

In teaching my class, "Dance For The Ageless,"  (for 40 or 50 years old & up), I find that I must be able to refer to what I now wish to call Spatial Territories.

Laban had simply called them different kinds of space:  General Space, Kinespheric Space and Inner Space. 

I do not want to use the word "kinds" as it feels too generic. I am choosing with my students therefore to refer to Spatial Territories, as in,  "Today's class will occur entirely in the territory of Kinespheric Space,"  or"The Territory for today's class will be that of Inner Space."

As for Laban's use of the word "General,"  well, that is much too general for my pedagogical requirements, so I am calling that Territory the Ambient Space. 

After conferring with Charlotte Wile I have created Motif Symbols for these three Territories. My original concoction utilized a blank rectangle, and  Charlotte politely informed me that that was the conventional indication for Direction. She also said that she would prefer not to use the capital 'K' as I had inside the rectangle to indicate "Kinesphere"  because the 'K' was so strongly associated with "Folding to the Side."  She clued me into a symbol that Knust had utilized for the Kinesphere.  I have attached my latest Motif Notation concoction. 

Four immediate questions arise when one gets more focused and specific about each of these three Territories. 

1] Can one have Space Effort in Inner Space?  (I think not, but...)


2] If one says yes to the above, what would NOT having Space Effort in Inner Space look like and how would that determination be made?


3] What is the difference between the Basic Body Action of “Addressing” and Space Effort?


4] How does the expression of Ambient Space come about, or, of what is the expression of Ambient Space composed? (This question may have been addressed, if not answered, in previous posts concerning "projection" or maybe even, "of what is charisma composed?".)


I will be interested in any and all feedback on this category of Space and Motif Notation.

Happy Valentines Day!

Richard

[The following was attached to Ricard's posting. For a larger view of the attachment go here.]







From Leslie Bishko - February 14, 2014

Hello Richard,

I get where you are going with this.  I'm fascinated by your description of inner space, which for me evokes the way a mover can have the mental image of connecting a bony landmark or organ to something external, in the ambient space.  The witness/audience/public can also perceive these relationships.  This has interesting implications for relating the body architecture to spatial scaffolding.

Leslie


From Gretchen Dunn - February 14, 2014

I like very much your use of the word ‘territories’—territories are known and have boundaries. There are also ‘unknown territories’ that could be explored—part of a territorial boundary that is incomplete.
Sounds exciting!

Gretchen



From Fanchon Shur - February 14, 2014

[Richard's comments are in black.  Frachon's comments are in red.]


On Feb 14, 2014, at 12:42 PM, Richard Haisma wrote: 


Hello Labanistas and Bartenieophiles,


In teaching my class, "Dance For The Ageless,"  (for 40 or 50 years old & up),


Being almost 79, I love your title.

I find that I must be able to refer to what I now wish to call Spatial Territories. 

territories is concise, real, clear.


Laban had simply called them different kinds of space:  General Space, Kinespheric Space and Inner Space. 

I do not want to use the word "kinds" as it feels too generic. I am choosing with my students therefore to refer to Spatial Territories,
as in,

 "Today's class will occur entirely in the territory of Kinespheric Space,"  or "The Territory for today's class will be that of Inner Space."

As for Laban's use of the word "General,"  well, that is much too general for my pedagogical requirements, so I am calling that Territory 

the Ambient Space. Such a clear expression.  Ambience is clear...charisma, projection,  and  as Bonnie Bainbridge Cohen often says "can you sense the change in the room?"

After conferring with Charlotte Wile I have created Motif Symbols for these three Territories. My original concoction utilized a blank rectangle, and Charlotte politely informed me that that was the conventional indication for Direction. She also said that she would prefer not to use the capital 'K' as I had inside the rectangle to indicate "Kinesphere"  because the 'K' was so strongly associated with "Folding to the Side."

can any one explain this? I know the big X as a description of a Fundamentals form.....what is the K about.

She clued me into a symbol that Knoos had utilized for the Kinesphere.  I have attached my latest Motif Notation concoction. 

Four immediate questions arise when one gets more focused and specific about each of these three Territories. 

1] Can one have Space Effort in Inner Space?  (I think not, but)

what is different about space effort from the other efforts in Inner Space?

 2] If one says yes to the above, what would NOT having Space Effort in Inner Space look like and how would that determination be made?

I would say that NOT having space effort would accent what you do have.  Similarly, if you have no strength effort you would perceive that as a different quality than not having Space effort.

 3] What is the difference between the Basic Body Action of “Addressing”  and Space Effort?

Can you help me with what Basic Body Action means(does that mean something that is not Shaping or Space and what does "addressing" mean.

 4] How does the expression of Ambient Space come about, or, of what is the expression of Ambient Space composed? (This question may have been addressed, if not answered, in previous posts concerning "projection" or maybe even, "of what is charisma composed?".)

i would love to revisit those responses.  They intrigue me greatly.  I studied 4 years with Barbara Brennan, who "saw" energy fields, different colors, shapes, sizes, etc.  all of those AURAS ARE also for me Ambience, Charisma, 

I will be interested in any and all feedback on this category of Space and Motif Notation.

Happy Valentines Day!

Richard



From Peggy Hackney - February 14, 2014

Dear Richard and Leslie,

My understanding of the first symbol you have listed (which you call Inner Space) is "Small Kinesphere" (in the personal kinesphere territory).

Your second symbol, which you call Kinespheric Space, I teach as "Large 3-D Kinesphere."

Your third symbol, which you call Ambient Space, I teach as "Very Large Kinesphere."

I like the word "Territories" and I agree with Gretchen about the "unknown territories." What we "know" can only be known in relationship to acknowledging the "unknown." More aspects are always revealing themselves. :)

My prime example of "Inner Direct Space Effort" for myself is when I am consciously tracing the connections to boney landmarks in my mind's image as I move. I feel this is one powerful way that Somatics invites giving Attention to our inner landscape.

Cheers,
Peggy


From Gretchen Dunn - February 14, 2014

Peggy’s post reminds me of the term from Nancy Stark Smith, often used in the warm-up for the underscore:  ‘skinisphere’: everything contained in our sack of skin.  It calls to something more substantial than ‘inner space’ to my mind tho’.

Gretchen 


From Peggy Hackney - February 14, 2014

Dear Gretchen,

Hmmmm, "skinisphere" to me is more about touch and contact at that boundary. It is less about what is inside the skin….What do others of you think?

cheers,
Peggy


From Sandi Kurtz - February 14, 2014

Oh, I like that one!

sandi kurtz


From Gretchen DunnFebruary 14, 2014

It (skinisphere) is always quite specifically described as what’s inside the skin, not as a border, though I can see that easily too.

Gretchen


From Tara stepenberg  - February 14, 2014

hi richard et al

i always love your ideas and this area is one of my favorites -
these are some first thoughts (i may not have second thoughts right now as i prepare for a trip to asia)

i remember in my  "program" there was a discussion about space effort for "inner space" (and the concept of "inner space" is interesting for those of us who traverse the landscapes of inner space by moving through what might be thought of as "outer-space") - i will not claim to remember Irmgard's comments (peggy may actually have the correct notes) about dancers in trance who clearly are involved in inner space, being very clear about their space effort in those realms -- but i would like to recall that this is indeed possible. Although I cannot think of a concrete example, in my experience as mover and observer,  Space Effort is about  attending   - whether  in "inner" or "outer" landscapes.

Don't have comments about your actual symbols

I like the concept of territories

"skinisphere" - ? interesting new idea for me -- -a permiable edge between what's "inside" and "outside" of me?

i wish i could send you all a movement phrase right now - some kind of enveloping hello

smiles
tara


From  Fanchon Shur - February 14, 2014

I love skinesphere for the boundary between the inner and the outer territory

Fanchon Shur


From Fanchon Shur  - February 14, 2014

Peggy I agree it's exactly that
it is the boundary

Fanchon Shur


From  Jeffrey-Scott Longstaff - February 15, 2014

Re: Territory

Keep in mind that "Territory" has a specific defined spatial meaning:
-- term territory refers to any sociographical area that an animal of a particular species consistently defends --
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territory_(animal) >
-- When I see the word "territory" I immediately think of this definition - of a space which I will defend and fight for since I feel it belongs to me. 

This use of "territory" is obviously applicable to space harmony studies concerning "personal space" and "interpersonal distance", and is used in Halls studies of "proxemics" which includes consideration of "Territory" 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proxemics >

Is your use of Territory the same as this already defined standard use?  -- an area of space which I will defend against any perceived intruders?  If so, it is great.  If Not, it is something to consider.

Jeffrey



From Beverly Dunn- February 15, 2014

To address Jeffrey's point, would the term "realm" versus "territory" perhaps still capture the intent or does that introduce other issues?


From  Karen Studd  - February 15, 2014

For me at least, any term that includes "sphere"  indicates spatial volume. A "boundary"  has a very different spatial association. Boundary can have a linear spatial representation. Boundary I associate with the container rather than the content contained within/without. 


Karen 


From  Richard Haisma - February 15, 2014

Hello  Peggy and Labanistas,


Yes, I did have misgivings that the new symbols  I was proposing might be just what, or something similar to, some previous understanding or use of them had been. That "X" I put inside that little "bowl" to indicate Inner Space does, after all, have a certain history, and if the little "bowl" is to stand for "kinesphere" then that "X" may not really be inclined to suggest "inner" but rather, as you use it, just "small kinesphere."  And similarly with my other two symbols. Yes, I get this. However, it seems that  you telling us also here that you do indeed have and use a symbol for just the "kinesphere" by itself. Is that right? That is, are you using that little bowl, or half oval, that I just used,   as a symbol for "kinesphere.? If so, can we then not just qualify that little bowl somehow and conjure up Inner Space or Ambient Space? It that is the case, here's another proposal.

Best,
Richard

[The following was attached to Ricard's posting. For a larger view of the attachment go here.]










From  Richard Haisma February 15, 2014

Dear Peggy and Gretchen,

While I find "skinisphere" amusing, and perhaps a useful image in a context of awakening the senses, I agree with Peggy. It sends my mind not at all to Space but to tactility.

Richard


From Peggy Hackney February 15, 2014

Hi, Richard,

This second proposal seems on the right track to me….And I'm wondering if having just one little tick on the inside and outside would work for you?


From Tara Stepenberg February 15, 2014

The new symbols make send to me. And as I read more carefully I understand that my previous comments were coming from a slightly different lens.  Peggy's example of inner space makes sense to me and I am sure there are other examples of attention in inner space.

Blessings, tara



From Sandi Kurtz February 15, 2014

What she [Karen Studd] said.

sandi kurtz

On 2/15/14 Karen Studd wrote: 
For me at least, any term that includes "sphere"  indicates spatial volume. A "boundary"  has a very different spatial association. Boundary can have a linear spatial representation. Boundary I associate with the container rather than the content contained within/without. 


From  Richard Haisma February 15, 2014

Hello Jeffrey and Everyone,

I'm first of all not attached to that exact word of "territory" as such, but I do wish to avoid the blandness of such possible expressions as "type of space," or "kind of space."

I do not personally feel the attachment of animal aggression to the word "territory" that  you indicate might presently be out there in the verbal environment. Yet even that aura around the word would not be inappropriate for our purposes, that is, not the aggressive defense of these three different kinds of space, but the word's seemingly clear demarcation of locations  of space with different atmospheres or psychologies about them.

I'm thinking of usage similar to when we ask, "What crystalline form do you see happening in that dance?"   Or, "What crystalline form  are you primarily expressing with your movement?"  

Beverly Dunn mentioned the word "realm" and my only problem with that is that it sounds a little too grand, while also as a word being too soft off the  tongue.  I like the repeated percussive "t" in "territory," since it seems to call a little more attention to itself. 

The overall motivation here is simply to allow students to know more clearly where they need to focus at any given moment. Students have told me that it was helpful to hear, for example, in a class dealing with Shape-flow, "We are now  only in Inner Space, you have no interest in the Outer world around you, and this is your natural and healthy narcissism at work."  Also, I have seen performances by supposedly advanced dancers who apparently did not know that sometimes one can be entirely inside oneself and sometimes  entirely outside oneself, and that an important source of dynamics and charisma for a performer is knowing how to manipulate and modulate that Inner-Outer equation moment by moment. I want a Title and Category for just this range of experience, and because I sometimes use Motif Notation for my lessen plans I need symbols to notate those classes. Whether or not the word "territory" is the best one is less important to me than the clarity of "where are we moving from now?"  Finally, as Leslie Bishko sensed behind my motivations, Spatial Intent as a connector between Inner and Outer might become enhanced if the habits of knowing what's exactly the Inner participant-part and where's the Outer goal-part can be daily made more clear. 

Best,
Richard


From  Richard Haisma February 15, 2014

Hi Peggy,


Yes, you're right:  why two ticks; more economical and elegant with just one. Here's then my latest version. I wonder if we've nailed something here. I'm still somehow waiting for the other shoe to drop.

Richard

[The following was attached to Ricard's posting. For a larger view of the attachment go here.]




























From Gretchen Dunn  February 15, 2014

Dear Richard and Peggy,


Yes—the tactility of all the organs and bones and lymph and blood is in ‘skinisphere’. And ‘inner space’ maybe more micro with lots of space between the elemental bodies.  Two words, from different disciplines, evoking different view, attitudes to the same real estate.

Gretchen



From Megan Reisel February 15, 2014

Here's another thought for Richard


Having been a martial artist for over 26 years, the experience of the spatial distance around my body was always strongly intertwined with Time. It was the time/ space evaluation that one needs to perceive in order to understand 'defending' itself.

Megan



From Fanchon Shur February 15, 2014

this is getting exciting.....and elegant.



Fanchon Shur



From Regina MirandaFebruary 16, 2014

Dear all,

Agreeing and enjoying following this beautiful conversation. Thanks to all involved, moreover to Richard who inspired it.

Regina